March Madness

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In the winter of 2011, Leo was hospitalized for several days for a bout of gastroenteritis that further complicated his diabetes management.  While this hospital admission was not fun, at least there were no surprises   (i.e. no unexpected diagnoses). After his discharge, my husband Adam realized that he needed to start addressing his own health issues.  He had been blaming his stomach discomfort on his reflux but his symptoms were getting worse. While Leo and I were in the hospital, Adam developed left sided chest pain after shoveling our driveway. This was obviously worrisome and he FINALLY agreed to see his doctor.  Thankfully, his cardiac work-up was fine.  But his GI work-up revealed a clear-cut case of “cholecystitis” which means gallbladder disease/stones and inflammation. So we scheduled surgery ASAP. It was done laparoscopically (minimally invasive) and he recovered well.

Gallbladder disease is not uncommon for people in their 40’s, and patients usually recover well because the procedure is now done laparascopically. What I didn’t tell Adam is that when I was doing my third year clerkships in medical school, my first patient was a man with terrible complications from a laparascopic cholecystectomy.   I also recall that Andy Warhol died unexpectedly from a routine cholecystectomy at New York Hospital, on a floor right near the pediatric ward where I interned.  One of the problems with being a physician is that you can always think of a potential bad outcome. That is what we are trained to do!

I must admit that upon hearing Adam’s diagnosis, I was concerned for him but there was a little voice inside of me screaming “what about me?” I was so exhausted from the week in the hospital with Leo that I couldn’t imagine where I would get the strength to care for the whole family. Adam’s post-op recovery entailed 2 weeks of no driving and 6 weeks of not lifting anything heavier than 10 Lbs. So many people wanted to help, but it is hard to help out with what we do. All the carbohydrate counting, measuring, monitoring, cooking, pump site changes, growth hormone injections, etc…

A few days after Adam’s discharge we celebrated the festive holiday of Purim,  when the Jewish people commemorate  their cunning victory over an evil Persian leader from ancient times. I took my boys to our temple’s Purim Carnival, which is always loud, over stimulating and filled with food that my kids can’t and shouldn’t eat. It was challenging not to have Adam with me. Although it was fun to see our friends , I couldn’t wait to get home.  Monday, the following day, was a dismal mix of rain/snow/sleet. I was so tired that I forgot the kids were staying later at school for me to pick them up for Tae Kwon Do. I realized this when they weren’t home by 4:15 and drove to school to pick them up.  I was too exhausted to bring them to TKD, so I just brought them home. I remember driving and thinking   now it’s 5pm and I am so tired that I either need a nap or a large coffee. Leo and our dog Pepper were excited to see the boys and ran around the hall entrance excitedly. Within minutes of taking off my shoes, I heard a loud scream. There was Leo, holding his head, blood gushing everywhere. Other than where the walls meet, there are no sharp corners in my house. I have seen enough head injuries in my practice from fireplace mantles, tables and entertainment centers that all of the corners in my house are padded. Even our piano bench has a “diaper” on it.

Leo had collided with the wall corner, and he was standing on our carpet while his head continued to bleed. After bringing him to the bathroom to stop the bleeding with a pressure dressing and ice, we got ready to go to the ER and meet our friend the plastic surgeon (I now have his cell number). Leo is a resilient kid. He managed to eat some dinner while I got his test kit/food and his Nintendo DS ready. As Adam helped put on his shoes, Leo looked up at us and asked “How many days am I going to have to stay in the hospital this time?” God Bless my brave, funny, rambunctious boy….

It was a non-eventful trip to the ER. Irrigation to the wound site, 3 staples to the scalp, and we were quickly on our way home. With Leo’s friendly face, big cheeks and sense of humor, he is a magnet for good will and smiles wherever he goes. And he is so tolerant of any physical manipulation that people are always impressed with his stoicism.  Although the outside world doesn’t see his tantrums and devilish behavior at home, I’m sure it’s not hard to imagine.  But, as everyone knows, all of what happened on that particular Monday is regular kid’s stuff. It had nothing to do with diabetes or other chronic issues. The fallout is that I was even more drained that night. I went to sleep fantasizing about a time in my future when I wouldn’t be so important to so many people.

At school the following day, Leo was excited to “show and share” his wound and staples with his classmates. Later that night I brought his brothers to watch him in the nursery school Purim Play. Low and behold, our plastic surgeon sat in the row behind us, watching his 2 year old twins perform…


3 thoughts on “March Madness

  1. Thank you for this blog. Your strength as a person, mom, and physician is amazing. Your family is so lucky to have you. I hope this year Purim is a little calmer and that you are all healthy as you celebrate!

  2. Debbie….. You are truly a very stong mother who deals with life’s ups and downs !!! Not everyone can bear the burdens you have had to. Do not take this for granted. You have a wonderful family who is blessed to have you! Xo Theresa

  3. You are a rock! Hope this coming march will be more quiet and peaceful!
    How is Ethan doing? Say hello from Johannes!
    All the best to you and your beautiful family!
    Greetings from Germany! Anett

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