That darn 100th day of school!

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Who remembers the 100th day of school celebrations in your children’s kindergarten class? It is a day the students and teachers eagerly await as they count from the last days of summer to the middle of February. The day itself involves a party, counting various items, decorating hats and of course…food.

The children eagerly await this day. They count and remind both parents and their older siblings, who roll their eyes and recall the days when their homework was as easy as counting to 100.

Two weeks before the celebration (day 90) my 5 year old son brought home a paper with instructions. On Leo’s paper, fruit loops and macaroni were the items circled for me to bring to the classroom. Since my children have celiac disease and can only eat gluten-free food, I asked the teacher if I could substitute another cereal for everyone to enjoy. That would be fine, she said, as there were enough other people to bring in the Fruit Loops. My pantry is well-stocked with GF pasta so the macaroni was no problem. I went to three stores to find a yummy tasting GF cereal that he approved. Trix had already been used in another school project, Koala crisps were too small, and Chocolate Chex were nowhere to be found that week. We settled on Cocoa Pebbles (rather than Cocoa Puffs which contain gluten)  and brought them to school.

The 100th day party looked like it was a big success as we saw the children pouring into the schoolyard with their hats and stickers. Leo waited patiently for his older brothers to return from school to show them what he brought home. “Make sure you don’t open my bag until my brothers come home!”   After they arrived and we sat around the table, Leo proudly put on his hat, zipped open his Batman backpack and pulled out his Fruit Loop chain necklace.  Grinning from ear to ear, he placed it around his neck. I asked “Wow Leo, did you make that?” “Yes, and there are 100 pieces,” he replied as he started to lick one.  Softly I said “Well you know those have gluten and you really can’t eat them, honey.” And with that, in one motion he angrily yanked off the necklace, threw it on the ground and shouted “So then I made that for nothing?” and began to cry.

My son Leo is not exactly even-tempered. He often acts out when he doesn’t get his way, he is loud and out-spoken. But as I held him at that moment and watched the tears rolling down his cheeks while he took deep breaths, I noticed his voice was trembling. I don’t remember the last time I had seen him so SAD. “But what about the Cocoa Pebbles and the macaroni?” I foolishly asked. I felt desperate! Then my 9 year old son Ben chimed in “You see mommy??? That’s what it’s always like for us! We are always eating something different!”  It’s true, I had made sure that the kids always had an alternative snack for birthday and other school celebrations. But invariably there were issues. One time, a bag of Hershey kisses was kept in a cabinet and a mouse found them.   Occasionally the desserts or my homemade bread would get thrown out from the fridge or freezer in the faculty room. I guess I can understood how that could happen due to a shortage of space, but how do you explain that to the disappointed child?

These thoughts raced through my mind, recollections of my attempts throughout the years to create a world where my kids could enjoy treats along with everyone else. How many other mothers out there do this for their children? Thousands, I know, during this day and age. Food allergies and dietary restrictions are everywhere. Getting it right takes a lot of practice and patience.

Ben came over and whispered to me “Mommy, keep Leo away from the kitchen for now.”  I then looked across the room at the kitchen counter where my 11 year old son Sam had taken a small screwdriver and a box of gluten free Puffins cereal. Since two of my children are also diabetic, he was weighing them out on a scale in order to calculate the number of carbohydrates they contained.  Puffins are bloated squares made from rice flour and their shape and consistency make them big enough to poke a hole through with a screwdriver. He was determined to make his little brother a necklace for the 100th day of school.

So, I sat there holding Leo: his body defeated and collapsed in my arms, his tears soaking my shirt. And I watched what his big brothers were doing. I was speechless and so grateful for their caring and resourcefulness. Then Leo started wiggling in my lap and I knew that I needed to figure out a way to distract him in order to keep the necklace a surprise until it was completed.  These boys, I thought… I must be doing something right.


6 thoughts on “That darn 100th day of school!

  1. I am touched by your story. Your incredible love and constant focus on your children’s needs from physical to emotional is tireless. Many seemingly small and happy events other busy moms can take for granted you, and others mom’s like you, need to carefully consider and plan.

  2. My sister’s son is now showing his frustration with having to take “weird” food to school. It is very tough on his mother, too, as she understands how important it is to fit in with your peers at his age. Your sons are so kind and creative and empathy like that is taught. Good for you, MDMommy!!

  3. The amazing thing here is not your younger sons reaction and upset at not being able to eat his necklace. The amazing thing is the sensitivity of the two older siblings trying to help him out in a situation they have unfortunately already experienced…just not being like everyone else.That sensitivity reflects not only their nature but good parenting.

  4. Found you blog while looking for info on Type I diabetes and am thankful I did. This post brought tears to my eyes. You are an amazing mom! Keep up the good work. My daughter was diagnosed with Type I diabetes almost 2 weeks ago. I pray I can do the amazing job you are doing with your boys. Thanks!

    • Thank you Melissa, I am so glad you found this helpful. Reaching people like you is the reason I started this blog, so I appreciate you taking the time to comment. Stay strong, you don’t yet know your own strength, you will be an amazing mom too.

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